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Everything You Want to Know About Multivitamins

Everything You Want to Know About Multivitamins

What are Multivitamins? 

Multivitamins are dietary supplements that include a variety of vitamins and minerals. They are intended to supplement a person's daily diet by providing a variety of essential nutrients that may be lacking. Multivitamins can be taken as pills, tablets, or capsules and contain a variety of vitamins, minerals, and other ingredients such as herbs and amino acids.

Why do we need Multivitamins in our body? 

Multivitamins help to ensure that the body receives the vitamins and minerals it requires to function properly. They may help to lower the risk of certain health conditions and provide an energy boost. Multivitamins can also help fill dietary gaps and provide extra nutrients to promote overall health and well-being.

How can Multivitamins help our body?

Multivitamins are dietary supplements that combine vitamins and minerals in a single dose. Taking a multivitamin on a daily basis can help provide essential nutrients that the body requires to function properly. Here are some of the possible advantages of taking a multivitamin.

Promotes overall health

Multivitamins help to fill any nutrient gaps in the diet, which can improve overall health and well-being.

Boosts immune system 

Many multivitamins contain vitamins like vitamin C, vitamin D, and zinc, which can help the body fight infections and support immune function.

Supports energy levels 

Vitamin B, such as B12 and B6, aid in the conversion of food into energy and can help reduce fatigue and tiredness.

Promotes healthy skin, hair, and nails: Vitamins like A, C, and biotin are essential for healthy skin, hair, and nails.

Helps with bone health: Calcium and vitamin D are essential for bone health, and many multivitamins contain these nutrients.

It's important to note that while multivitamins can be beneficial for some people, they are not a substitute for a healthy diet. A varied diet rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean protein, and healthy fats is still the best way to ensure that the body receives all of the nutrients it requires.

What is Vitamin B2, B3, B6 and C?

Vitamins B2, B3, B6, and C are all water-soluble vitamins that play important roles in the body's health. Here's a quick rundown of each vitamin.

Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin): This vitamin is involved in energy production and is required for fat, carbohydrate, and protein metabolism. It is also necessary for the maintenance of healthy skin, eyes, and nervous system.

Vitamin B3 (Niacin): Niacin is essential for energy production and the metabolism of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins. It also aids in the maintenance of healthy skin, nerves, and digestive system.

Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine): This vitamin is involved in protein metabolism and aids the body in the production of red blood cells. It also supports the nervous system and aids in the production of hormones and neurotransmitters.

Vitamin C (Ascorbic acid): Vitamin C is an antioxidant that helps protect cells from free radical damage. It also supports the immune system, promotes wound healing, and aids in iron absorption.

All of these vitamins can be obtained through a healthy and balanced diet that includes whole grains, lean protein, fruits and vegetables, and dairy products. In some cases, however, a supplement may be recommended to help meet daily requirements. Before taking any supplements, consult with a healthcare professional.

What is Vitamin B2 and its function?

One of the eight B vitamins is vitamin B2, also known as riboflavin. It is essential for many bodily functions, including energy production, fat and carbohydrate metabolism, the maintenance of healthy skin and eyes, and the production of red blood cells. In this article, we'll look at vitamin B2 and how it works in the body.

Functions of Vitamin B2:

Energy Production: One of vitamin B2's primary functions is to assist the body in producing energy. This is because vitamin B2 is involved in carbohydrate, fat, and protein metabolism. It specifically aids in the conversion of these macronutrients into ATP, the primary source of energy for the body's cells.

Red Blood Cell Production: Vitamin B2 is also required for the formation of red blood cells. This is due to its role in the synthesis of haemoglobin, the protein found in red blood cells that transports oxygen throughout the body. Anemia can occur if the body does not produce enough haemoglobin due to a lack of vitamin B2.

Antioxidant Activity: Vitamin B2 has antioxidant properties, which means it helps protect the body from free radical damage. Free radicals are unstable molecules that can cause cell and DNA damage, ultimately leading to ageing and disease. Vitamin B2 aids in the neutralisation of free radicals, preventing them from causing damage.

Skin and Eye Health: Vitamin B2 is necessary for good skin and eye health. This is due to its involvement in the production of collagen, a protein that gives skin its elasticity and aids in its health. Vitamin B2 is also necessary for the production of glutathione, a substance that protects the eyes from damage.

Sources of Vitamin B2:

Vitamin B2 is found in many foods, including:

Dairy products: Milk, cheese, and yogurt are all good sources of vitamin B2.

Meat: Beef, pork, and liver are all good sources of vitamin B2.

Fish: Fish such as salmon, trout, and mackerel are good sources of vitamin B2.

Eggs: Eggs are also a good source of vitamin B2.

Vegetables: Leafy green vegetables such as spinach and broccoli are good sources of vitamin B2.

Grains: Whole grains such as brown rice and whole wheat bread are good sources of vitamin B2.

What is Vitamin B3 and its function?

Niacin, or vitamin B3, is one of the eight B vitamins that are essential for human health. It is a water-soluble vitamin, which means it cannot be stored in the body and must be obtained through diet. Niacin is essential for many bodily functions, including energy metabolism, DNA repair, and maintaining healthy skin, nerves, and digestion. This article will look at the functions of vitamin B3 in the body as well as the sources of this essential nutrient.

Functions of Vitamin B3:

Energy Metabolism: One of the primary functions of niacin is to aid in the conversion of food into energy. Niacin is an essential component of the coenzymes NAD and NADP, which play critical roles in carbohydrate, fat, and protein metabolism.

DNA Repair: Niacin is also involved in DNA repair, which is necessary for the maintenance of healthy cells and the prevention of cancer. It aids in the repair of DNA damage caused by radiation, chemicals, and other environmental toxins.

Cardiovascular Health: Niacin has been shown to be beneficial to cardiovascular health. It can help lower LDL ("bad") cholesterol, raise HDL ("good") cholesterol, and lower the risk of heart disease.

Skin Health: Niacin is essential for healthy skin because it improves skin barrier function, reduces inflammation, and promotes the production of ceramides, which are necessary for skin hydration.

Sources of Vitamin B3:

Niacin can be found in a variety of foods, including:

Meat: Chicken, turkey, beef, and pork are all good sources of niacin.

Fish: Tuna, salmon, and other fish are good sources of niacin.

Grains: Whole grains such as wheat, barley, and quinoa are good sources of niacin.

Legumes: Beans, lentils, and peas are good sources of niacin.

Nuts and Seeds: Peanuts, sunflower seeds, and almonds are good sources of niacin.

Vegetables: Mushrooms, avocados, and sweet potatoes are good sources of niacin.

What is Vitamin B6 and its function?

Vitamin B6, also known as pyridoxine, is one of the eight essential B vitamins for human health. It is a water-soluble vitamin, which means it cannot be stored in the body and must be obtained through diet. Vitamin B6 is essential for many bodily functions, including metabolism, immunity, and nervous system function. This article will look at the functions of vitamin B6 in the body as well as the sources of this essential nutrient.

Functions of Vitamin B6:

Aids in Metabolism: One of vitamin B6's primary functions is to assist the body in the metabolization of protein, carbohydrates, and fats. This is accomplished by assisting in the breakdown of these nutrients into smaller molecules that can be used for energy.

Supports Brain Development and Function: B6 is essential for brain development and function. It contributes to the production of neurotransmitters, which are chemicals that transmit signals in the brain. It is also involved in the synthesis of myelin, a fatty substance that insulates nerve fibres and aids in signal transmission.

Helps Regulate Mood: Vitamin B6 regulates mood by aiding in the production of serotonin, a neurotransmitter involved in mood, appetite, and sleep regulation.

Supports Immune Function: Immune function depends on vitamin B6. It aids in the production of white blood cells, which are responsible for fighting infection and disease.

Sources of Vitamin B6:

Vitamin B6 can be found in a variety of foods, including:

Meat: Chicken, turkey, beef, and pork are all good sources of vitamin B6.

Fish: Salmon, tuna, and other fish are good sources of vitamin B6.

Grains: Whole grains such as brown rice, wheat, and oats are good sources of vitamin B6.

Legumes: Beans, lentils, and chickpeas are good sources of vitamin B6.

Vegetables: Potatoes, spinach, and carrots are good sources of vitamin B6.

What is Vitamin C and its function?

Vitamin C, also known as ascorbic acid, is a water-soluble vitamin that is required for many biological processes in the human body. It is a potent antioxidant that aids in the protection of cells and tissues from the oxidative damage caused by free radicals.

Function of Vitamin C in the Body:

Collagen Synthesis: Vitamin C is necessary for the synthesis of collagen, a protein required for the structure, function, and repair of connective tissues such as skin, bones, cartilage, and blood vessels. Collagen is the body's most abundant protein, and vitamin C is required for its synthesis. Vitamin C is also involved in the production of other connective tissue proteins, such as elastin and fibronectin.

Antioxidant Function: Vitamin C is a potent antioxidant that helps protect cells and tissues from oxidative damage caused by free radicals. Free radicals are unstable molecules that can damage DNA, proteins, and lipids, resulting in cell damage and disease. Vitamin C prevents oxidative damage by neutralising free radicals.

Immune Function: Vitamin C promotes the production and activity of white blood cells, such as neutrophils, lymphocytes, and phagocytes, which aid in the fight against infections and diseases. Vitamin C also increases the production of antibodies, which are proteins that help the body recognise and fight off foreign invaders such as viruses and bacteria.

Iron Absorption: Vitamin C improves iron absorption from plant-based foods by converting non-heme iron into a more absorbable form. Iron is required for the production of haemoglobin, a protein found in red blood cells that transports oxygen throughout the body.

Wound Healing: Vitamin C is essential for wound healing because it promotes the production of collagen, which is required for tissue repair and regeneration. Vitamin C also helps to strengthen the immune system, which is required for fighting off infections that can stymie the healing process.

Neurotransmitter Synthesis: Vitamin C is involved in the synthesis of neurotransmitters like dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin, which are important for mood regulation, sleep, and cognitive function. Vitamin C is also required for the synthesis of carnitine, a molecule that aids in the transport of fatty acids into cells for energy production.

Skin Health: Vitamin C is essential for healthy skin because it promotes collagen production and protects skin cells from oxidative damage caused by UV radiation and other environmental factors.

Sources of Vitamin C:

Vitamin C is found in various foods, including fruits and vegetables. Some of the best sources of vitamin C include:

Citrus fruits, such as oranges, lemons, and grapefruits

Berries, such as strawberries, raspberries, and blueberries

Kiwifruit

Pineapple

Mango

Papaya

Melons, such as cantaloupe and honeydew

Tomatoes

Bell peppers

Broccoli

Brussels sprouts

Spinach

Cabbage

Cauliflower

Sweet potatoes


If we combine Vitamin B2, B3, B6, and C and Brown Rice Drink, how can it benefit our body?

Combining brown rice drink with foods high in vitamins B2, B3, B6, and C can provide the body with numerous health benefits. Here's how this combination can help your body:

Improved energy levels: Brown rice drink contains complex carbohydrates that provide sustained energy, and B vitamins such as B2, B3, and B6 are necessary for energy production in the body.

Reduced inflammation: Brown rice drink contains anti-inflammatory compounds that can help reduce inflammation in the body, and vitamin B6 has also been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties.

Enhanced immune function: Vitamin C is a powerful antioxidant that supports immune function, and brown rice drink is high in immune-supporting minerals like zinc and selenium.

Improved digestion: Brown rice drink contains prebiotic fibers that promote the growth of beneficial gut bacteria, and B vitamins like B2 and B6 help maintain a healthy digestive system.

Healthy skin and hair: Vitamin C is necessary for collagen production, which aids in the maintenance of healthy skin and hair, whereas vitamin B2 is required for the growth and repair of skin and hair cells.

What if we don't have enough Vitamin B2, B3, B6, and C in our body?

Lack of Vitamin B2, B3, B6, and C in the body can cause a variety of health problems. Here are some examples:

Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin) deficiency: Riboflavin deficiency can result in skin disorders, anaemia, and vision problems. It can also cause angular cheilitis, which causes cracks and sores at the corners of the mouth.

Vitamin B3 (Niacin) deficiency: Niacin deficiency can cause pellagra, a condition characterised by skin rash, diarrhoea, and dementia.

Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine) deficiency: Anemia, skin disorders, and nervous system issues can all result from pyridoxine deficiency. It can also weaken the immune system.

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